Sculpture-In-The-Garden

Sculpture-In-The-Garden - John Brown: 'The Listener'
Sculpture-In-The-Garden - Lucy Lutyens: 'Birdsong'
Sculpture-In-The-Garden - Lucy Lutyens: 'Circular Form'
Sculpture-In-The-Garden - Lucy Lutyens: 'Entwined'
The best time to visit the gallery to view or buy sculpture suitable for the garden, is from May to September.

Here you will find examples of sculptures that are either permanently exhibited in the garden, or which have been exhibited in the garden recently. Please click on an image to view full details of each artwork. The monumental sculptures by Maurice Blik can be viewed in the garden all year round.


TIPS FOR BUYING SCULPTURE FOR THE GARDEN

1. Prices are affected by three key factors:

- Reputation of the artist. You can usually expect to pay more for an artwork by an established or highly-regarded artist.

- Materials. Genuine bronze and real stone or marble are the highest quality media for outdoor sculpture. These materials will endure and often go up in value over time so it is advisable to buy the best quality materials that your budget will allow.

- Rareity. If a sculpture is unique i.e. only one exists, or is a limited edition (ideally under 25 for sculpture), the price will be higher than if it is a large edition or mass produced. Sculpt Gallery does not sell mass produced sculpture. All our sculptures are created and made by artists living in the UK.


2. Positioning
The positioning of any sculpture is key. Most sculptures benefit from being placed on a plinth to give them more height. As a general rule (although exceptions can work), the footprint of a plinth should be no more than 1-2 inches wider than the widest part of the sculpture. A plinth will also help with scale since sculptures tend to look smaller outdoors when viewed in context with buildings and trees.

- Placing sculpture in an open space often works better than amongst busy flower-beds or borders. For example, beside a pathway, on a low wall , or in a paved/lawned area.

- If your space is particularly busy, try bold, solid shapes.

- Where possible, place sculpture in a bright, sunny spot. If you're not blessed with a sunny site, light-toned sculptures will stand out better against dark undergrowth or in a shady area.

3. Maintenance.
All outdoor sculpture will attract a certain amount of dust, debris, algae and bird droppings. If keeping your sculpture in mint condition is important to you, it is vital to consider the medium and finish at the outset. Smooth surfaces, bronze and real stone are generally easily cleaned with a damp, lint-free cloth, or a soft brush. Always avoid using chemicals as these can damage the patina or surface. Heavily textured finishes tend to be harder to keep clean, and lightweight materials are more succeptible to weather damage, and breakage, which is not always easily repaired.

For further advice on buying or installing sculpture in the garden, please get in touch.